Fastjet Tanzania builds local capacity

Fastjet has prioritised the employment of local aviation staff and with its modern Airbus 319 aircraft, the airline gives budding and aspiring Tanzanian pilots the chance to fly its safe and fast aircraft Fastjet has prioritised the employment of local aviation staff and with its modern Airbus 319 aircraft, the airline gives budding and aspiring Tanzanian pilots the chance to fly its safe and fast aircraft

Fastjet Tanzania the low-cost carriers has promoted two of its First Officers to the rank of Captain in a bid to harness its human resource.

This makes a total of five Tanzanians who are certified captains flying commercial jets employed by the company.

The two, who were promoted to the captain’s rank are Soud Al – Toky and Abeid Mayoya and will be responsible for the operation and safety of the flights that they will captain on Fastjet Tanzania’s domestic and international routes. The duo will also lead and mentor a team of first officers as they build their aviation experience.

They both joined Fastjet in 2014 when the airline expanded its network in East Africa. According to both of them, there is a bright future in the aviation industry.

“Finding opportunities to further one’s career was previously hard to come by in Tanzania. Fastjet has prioritised the employment of local aviation staff and with its modern Airbus 319 aircraft, the airline gives budding and aspiring Tanzanian pilots the chance to fly its safe and fast aircraft,” Mayoya said.

Mayoya completed his studies in 2005 at Progress Flight Academy in Port Elizabeth and in 2006 he returned home and joined Precision Air where he spent eight years gaining experience in the aviation field. He quickly became a captain, having flown ATR 42, ATR 72 and Boeing 737 aircraft.

Al-Toky on the other hand, says that he is proud to be a Tanzanian furthering his aviation career with Fastjet, and encourages other Tanzanians pursuing careers as pilots to never give up as the opportunities are endless.

“I believe that the future of aviation across Africa is particularly bright, and aspiring Tanzanian pilots need to stay focused on achieving their dreams of becoming captains one day,” he says.

“Affordable air travel is the key to Tanzania’s economic growth, and knowing that you’ve played a part in stimulating the business and tourism sector is very rewarding,” notes Al-Toky.

He adds that he has gained invaluable experience over the past few years, and it’s an honour to fly Fastjet’s Airbus 319 aircraft.

“These jets aircraft are safe and quick, and their modern design makes them an absolute pleasure to fly – and comfortable for passengers too.”

Low-cost is quite simply the avoidance of costly frills, offering customers the lowest possible fares in addition to pay-as-you travel extras. This affords passengers the flexibility to pay for additional services such as a bag or refreshment rather than having to pay for it regardless whether you want it or not.

Importantly Fastjet low-cost definitely does not mean low quality. Despite the many challenges that exist outside our control we will be open, honest, transparent and communicative to ensure that your travel arrangements remain with the least amount of interruption.

Fastjet directly employs over 230 people in Tanzania and estimates that it has indirectly created employment for a further 500 and more in secondary services in all the countries it flies to.

Fastjet Airlines Limited (Tanzania), also known as Fastjet Tanzania, is a low-cost airline that operates flights under the fastjet brand in Tanzania. The airline was founded in 2011 as Fly540 Tanzania, but through the acquisition of Fly540 in 2012, it was rebranded as Fastjet Tanzania. It is based in Dar es Salaam.

Source: East African Business Week