UN’s IFAD to plough $150M in Mozambique agriculture

The United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) has promised to invest $150 million in Mozambican agriculture in the five-year period from 2018 to 2023, APA can report on Thursday.

“This sum is intended to support smallholder farmers, as well as aquaculture”, the IFAD representative in Mozambique Robson Mutandi told a media briefing in the Mozambican capital on Thursday, shortly before a meeting to review the performance of government projects financed by IFAD.

The meeting, also attended by representatives of the Bank of Mozambique and of the Ministries of Agriculture and of Economy and Finance, is intended to draw up an investment strategy for the next five years.

The UN agency said small farmers produce 80 percent of the food eaten in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, and 2.5 billion people worldwide depend directly on small farms for their incomes.

In 2011, the government and IFAD signed a Country Strategic Opportunities Programme (COSOP) which laid down a partnership framework, and this programme expired in 2015.

According to Mutandi, IFAD support over the next five years in the southern African nation will also be intended to boost rural markets, to respond to the challenges of climate change, and to deal with gender questions. Since it began cooperating with Mozambique in 1983, aid from IFAD has amounted to about $400 million.

An IFAD report studied 60 countries and found that economic growth alone was not enough to tackle rural poverty. Policies and investment by governments and businesses were also necessary.

Countries which had developed their rural areas the most included China, Vietnam, Indonesia, Ecuador, Cameroon, Malawi, Mozambique and Ethiopia.

Source: Journal du Cameroun