africa development Infrastructure Social Tanzania Tech

Facebook’s wireless tech to boost internet connectivity in Tanzania

Approximate reading time: 2 minutes

The company set up a WiFi technology in the CBD of Arusha to serve 2,600 Tanzanians with high-speed internet access.

 

Social network company Facebook has been working on an array of tech projects to ensure that people enjoy a consistent, high-bandwidth internet experience. A number of countries suffer poor infrastructure such as internet access that has proved to be a vital ingredient in today’s life. Innovation and technology are transforming the dynamism of both the business environment and social life leaving no room for tech ignorance. The rapid growth of smartphones in the market has called for better infrastructure development such as internet access.

It is estimated that by the end of last year, close to 23 million Tanzanians had internet access, with 83% of the number using their handsets to go online. Internet penetration in the same year increased to 45 per cent, registering a 5 per cent growth from 2016.

The American company understands the need for internet push as telcos look to serve their consumers with better internet access. Facebook introduced a Wi-Fi network to serve at least 2,600 Tanzanians in Arusha. The project would give internet users access to Facebook for free in the Central Business District. The challenge of network failures is a global barrier to internet push, and Facebook has launched a number of initiatives to combat the situation.

Wifi technology offers a cost-effective means to connect than the alternative means of mobile data packages. The setting up of wifi hotspots, however, is a bit expensive and only an elite number can afford. The data packages are relatively expensive and may not meet the needs of the users.

Facebook has launched similar projects in the US and looks to set up possible projects in Nairobi. High-speed networks improved technology to serve the users both effectively and sufficiently. Remote areas have been a prime target as the untapped market could offer business opportunities. Financial barrier and high operational cost have made investors shy off from investing in the remote regions to develop the areas.

Source: The Exchange

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